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Brazilian Visa- Learn about the different types and how to obtain each one

Posted 2018-08-21

It is necessary to have a Brazilian visa to facilitate the opening of a company in Brazil and for business management. There are several types of visa, and the chosen type must conform to the activities of the entrepreneur or investor.

In the last decade, Brazil has attracted foreign investors who want to start their business in the country. In addition to those who come in search of business opportunities, the country has also drawn the attention of foreign tourists, especially after being chosen to host major sports events such as the World Cup (2014) and the Olympic Games (2016).

Brazil applies the reciprocity policy, so it treats foreign citizens according to how that country treats Brazilians. Therefore, for some foreigners, coming to Brazil requires the issuance of a visa, which may take a while, as there is a lot of bureaucracy involved.

Visa options

According to the Brazilian Ministry of Justice, the visa options are:

Transit: for foreigners who need to pass through Brazil during a trip before reaching the final destination. Maximum stay of 10 days.

Tourist: for those who visit the country without migratory intention. Maximum stay of 90 days, extendable only once.

Temporary: travelers with cultural, educational, business and artistic purposes.

Permanent: for foreigners who intend to live in Brazil. Some permanent visas require prior authorization from the Ministry of Labor.

Courtesy: foreign domestic servants of heads of mission and consulates and diplomatic officials; foreign officials visiting the country unofficially, and dependent on holders of official or diplomatic visas. Valid for 90 months and can be extended.

Official: for officials of international agencies on official mission and officials of embassies and consulates who do not have diplomatic status. Valid for two years or for the period of the mission.

Diplomat: for diplomats and employees with diplomatic status, and heads of offices representing international bodies.

Who needs a visa?

Brazil requests visas based on the principle of reciprocity of treatment given to Brazilian citizens.

The first step is to go to the local Brazilian consulate with the following documentation:

  • Original passport
  • Passport-type photograph ID and a proof of address
  • A copy of the most recent monthly bank statement, showing the applicant’s name as the account holder, the balances of the accounts and the date of the statement
  • For some countries, such as the US, a photocopy of round trip tickets or a letter signed by a travel agent with confirmed round trip tickets will be required
  • If you are attending a conference or a seminar, you must present a letter of invitation from the organization in Brazil that is hosting the event and a day-by-day itinerary of the event
  • Yellow Fever Vaccination for those who had been to one of the Yellow Fever Countries within 90 days

Investor’s Visa

An investor’s visa is an effective way to obtain a permanent visa for Brazil. It is issued to those who wish to establish a business in the country and is generally valid for five years. The investment can be made in a corporation that already exists or can be used to build a new one.

To grant a permanent visa, the foreign investor must invest a minimum amount of BRL 500,000.00 in foreign currency.

The concept of social development will be considered, according to the following criteria:

  • Amount of jobs to be created in Brazil
  • Increase of productivity
  • Assimilation of technology
  • Fundraising for a specific sector

The Process

After the subscription, the visa application can be submitted to the Ministry of Labor.

Hiring a lawyer to whom you give full power of attorney to act on your behalf is a good option to facilitate the ongoing process as it allows you to apply for the visa before coming to Brazil. The following documents must be submitted:

  • Passport
  • Birth certificate (for those who are single)
  • Marriage certificate (for those who are married).

It is also relevant to submit copies of your current curriculum and any other relevant educational transcripts such as diplomas, awards, or certificates.

The next step is to certify these documents at a consulate in the applicant’s country of origin and then translate it by an official translator in Brazil. The documents must be certified at a local notary office and the full names of the applicant’s parents will be required as well.

Ask the lawyer to write a statement in which you commit to employ local labor and increase the number of jobs available in the community in which the company will be established.

The next document you will need is a CPF. This document identifies a taxpayer in the Federal Revenue Department. If you are not yet in Brazil, you can have your lawyer get a CPF for you. Once you have your CPF in hand, you can officially present your documents to the commercial, tax and immigration authorities of Brazil. In addition, it is important to get an RNE (foreign ID).

Learn more about our service for visa procedures

Author's post: Europartner Accounting

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